2005:
The Disneyland Resort Alumni Club hosts a 50th Reunion/Dinner at
the Disneyland Hotel Grand Ballroom.
1907:
Disney Legend Roy Williams, Roy, the "Big Mooseketeer" on TV's Mickey 
Mouse Club, is born in Coleville, Washington. He began working for Disney in 1930 
and as a writer/gagman contributed to such animated classics as Saludos AmigosThe Three 
CaballerosCured DuckDonald's Double Trouble, and Make Mine Music. As a sketch artist, 
Williams designed more than 100 insignias for the armed forces during Word War II, including the 
award-winning Flying Tigers insignia. He also designed the famous "Mouse" ears (along with
Disney costumer Chuck Keehne) for Mickey Mouse Club!
1932:
Disney's first full-color animated film (and the studio's first Technicolor cartoon),
 Flowers and Trees premieres at Grauman's Chinese Theater in Hollywood. Disney's
 short preceeds the MGM feature film Strange Interlude. This 29th Silly Symphony is considered a landmark in
 Disney animation and earned Disney the first Academy Award ever given for Best Cartoon Short Subject.

Also released is Disney's cartoon short Just Dogs - the final black & white Silly Symphony and one of only two
 Symphonies to feature a character named Pluto.
1956:
At Disneyland, the Mineral Hall Exhibit opens. Operated by Ultra-Violet Products, the Mineral
Hall features a free exhibit, which includes a mineral display lit by black-light. (The attraction will remain in 
operation until 1963.)
1973:
TIME magazine runs the article 
"Disney After Walt Is a Family Affair" in this week's issue.
1975:
Tiffini Hale, a member of Disney Channel's The All New Mickey
 Mouse Club, is born in Palm Springs, California.
1986:
Disney's Flight of the Navigator, starring Joey Cramer, is released in theaters.
A 12-year-old boy named David is abducted by an alien space craft and sent 8 years into the future. The
film also features Paul Reubens, Veronica Cartwright, Sarah Jessica Parker and Howard Hesseman.
1993:
Indiana Jones et le Temple du Péril (French for Indiana Jones and the Temple
of Peril) debuts at Disneyland Paris. A wild roller coaster, it is based on the Indiana Jones films. Sponsored by Esso, guests are taken on an adventure riding in a mining train through a lost temple.
1998:
Disney launches its first cruise ship, the Disney Magic.
It is one of the three largest ships in the world.
1999:
Rock 'n' Roller Coaster Starring Aerosmith, officially opens to all guests as part of the largest property-wide expansion in Disney World history. The indoor steel roller 
coaster features a high-speed launch of 0-60 mph in 2.8 seconds, three inversions, rock-concert lighting 
and a specially created Aerosmith soundtrack blasting from 120 on board speakers in each coaster 
train - all firsts for a Disney World attraction.

Also at Walt Disney World, FASTPASS begins operation on the Magic Kingdom 
attractions Space Mountain and Splash Mountain.
2006:
The Cheetah Girls perform at Disney's California Adventure.

High School Musical premieres on Disney Channel Brazil.
To commemorate the 40th 
anniversary of Disneyland, Disney 
created a series of collector 
cards, one for each year the park
had been open. A card for each 
year represented an event or an 
attraction. The cards were handed 
out to visitors to the park starting 
with the "1955" card on January 
21, 1995 and ending March 2, 1995 
with the "1995" card.

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 23   24   25   26   27   28   29   30   31
                        
JULY
JULY 30
Today is National Cheesecake Day
JULY 30
THIS SITE MADE
IN THE
USA
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Disney Magic launched
"Wait a minute, I love that idea. How about some backstage passes?" -Steven Tyler
1943:
Disney's Goofy cartoon Victory Vehicles is released. Directed by Jack Kinney and animated 
by Ward Kimball, Goofy demonstrates different modes of transportation for wartime travel.


1942:
Disney delivers the animated short Out of the Frying Pan into the Firing Line to the Conservation Division of the War Production Board. Minnie Mouse is taught the importance of conservation and recycling of bacon grease, which can be turned into glycerine for the war effort.
1948:
Disney releases the animated short The Trial of Donald Duck, the last cartoon
directed by Jack King. All Donald wants is a cup of coffee, but he gets mixed up in a misunderstanding
about the abnormally huge bill. (Animator Jack King will retire later in the year.)
1982:
Walt Disney Productions releases the live-action drama Tex, directed by Tim Hunter 
and based on the novel of the same name by S. E. Hinton. A coming-of-age adventure about 
two brothers who struggle to make it on their own when their mother dies and their father leaves them in their 
Oklahoma home, Tex stars Matt Dillon, Jim Metzler and Meg Tilly.
1963:
Actress Lisa Kudrow is born in Encino, California. Best known for her role as Phoebe Buffay
 on the hit television sitcom Friends, Kudrow provided the voice of Aphrodite for episodes of Disney's Hercules:
 The Animated Series.
1971:
The summer edition of My Weekly Reader (Vol. 40 issue 7) features the article "Disney World Rushes To Get Ready." A publication for young readers, it gives children a peak
at what is coming from a little Disney project in central Florida. The cover shows a child constructing his own 
castle and encouraging his dog to help out as opening day is only two months away! 
July 30
This Day in Disney History - THE FIRST - THE ORIGINAL
Traveling in time since 1999!
2015:
Disney historian and author John Culhane passes away at his home in
Dobbs Ferry, New York, at age 81. His books on Disney animation include “Walt Disney’s Fantasia” 
(1983), “Aladdin: The Making of an Animated Film” (1992) “and Fantasia/2000: Visions of Hope” (1999).
Culhane also penned more than 20 articles for the New York Times Magazine, including pieces about
Disney animation that gave unprecedented recognition to Walt Disney’s “Nine Old Men,” as well as to the
Studio’s next generation of artists and animators in the 1990s.